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What is a Burns Unit? The Burns unit at the Royal Children’s Hospital is the designated paediatric burns unit for Victoria. More than 600 children present...

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More than 3000 people attend Victorian Hospital Emergency Departments suffering burn related each year. 300 of those arrive at the Alfred Burns Unit...

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Burns Alliance

The Royal Children’s Hospital Burns Department and the Safety Centre, together with representatives from the state’s fire services and the Alfred Hospital and The Royal Children’s Hospital Burns Units have...

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Royal Children's Hospital

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The Royal Children’s Hospital has been one of the leaders in taking a strategic approach to the promotion of safety and the prevention of injuries through the establishment of the Safety Centre in 1979.  The VBPP enables the Royal Children's Hospital to share share knowledge, discuss issues around burns prevention and initiate and develop joint projects campaigns and media releases.

The Burns Unit at The Royal Children’s Hospital (RCH) is the designated paediatric burns unit for Victoria. The Burns Unit receives referrals from throughout metropolitan and country Victoria as well as southern New South Wales. More than 600 children present to the emergency department with a burn injury each year and the burns outpatient clinic sees over 900 patients. Of these over 100 children are admitted to the Burns Unit for acute treatment and/or surgery.  The children are treated by a multidisciplinary team throughout all aspects of their burn treatment.

The majority of burns seen are from preventable accidents. Through its partnership with VBPP the Burns Unit is actively working to reduce these preventable burns.

The RCH has been one of the leaders in taking a strategic approach to the promotion of safety and the prevention of injuries through the establishment of the Safety Centre in 1979.  The VBPP enables the RCH to share knowledge, discuss issues around burns prevention, and initiate and develop joint projects, campaigns and media releases.


Royal Children’s Hospital Safety Centre

Since 1979 the Safety Centre's mission has been to reduce injury mortality and morbidity by supporting communities to improve health, safety and wellbeing. The Centre's objective is to continue to be a leader in the provision of quality child safety promotion services that meet the needs of all.
Since 1999 the Safety Centre has been accredited by the World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Community Safety Promotion as an Affiliate Safe Community Support Centre.

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About the Safety Centre
The Safety Centre aims to reduce unintentional injury through:

  • Community consultation including the provision of resources to enhance support for those undertaking safety initiatives with local communities and with minority groups.
  • Information and advice
  • Education programs and services  
  • Safety products for sale
  • Collaborative health promotion initiatives and support for media campaigns, legislative reform, improved product and environmental design

Safety Centre History Summary

The Royal Children’s Hospital Safety Centre has been one of the leaders in taking a strategic approach to the promotion of safety and the prevention of injuries through the establishment of the Safety Centre in 1979 by Mr A Murray Clarke, a highly respected burns surgeon.

The Safety Centre was first opened under the name ‘Child Accident Prevention Centre’.  The Australian and New Zealand Burns Association office was established and Mr Murray Clarke was supported by burns surgeon and colleague, Mr. Julian Keogh.  The display and lecture venue was first located in a converted warehouse before moving to the Royal Children’s Hospital in 1983.

In 1984 the Centre received funding from the then ‘Health Department of Victoria’ to develop as a state wide resource with a brief to conduct several campaigns on child safety.  These campaigns included “If It’s Poison You Can’t Kiss It Better” and “Hot Water Burns Like Fire”.  As an emerging leader in safety promotion and injury prevention the Safety Centre opened the first Safety Shop in Australia and published the first Paediatric Safety and First Aid book.  The Centre also started running short CPR and paediatric first aid courses along with their ‘Dogs and Kids’ safety promotion campaign, centred around responsible dog ownership and dog bite prevention.

In the 1990’s the Centre took on a new image by taking on the name the Safety Centre, and partnered and worked closely with Metropolitan Fire Brigade, VicRoads, the Department of Human Services, WorkSafe, Farmsafe and VicHealth on implementing various programs in English and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Community safety programs.  The Safety Centre is highly regarded in Australia as a leader in safety education targeted at non-English speaking communities and using the Bi-lingual peer education model.

Under the umbrella of the Victorian Injury Prevention Committee, the Safety Centre also established and convened the Children’s Injury Prevention Working Group.

The Safety Centre was co-founder of the Australian Injury Prevention Network and the Victorian Safe Communities Network (VSCN) which was established in 1996, following the Fifth International Conference on Safe Communities held in Victoria.  
Since April 1999, The Safety Centre has been accredited as an Affiliate Support Centre of the  World Health Organisation (WHO) Collaborating Centre on Community Safety  Promotion.(http://www.phs.ki.se/csp/who_affiliate_centers_members_en.htm) to assist local Government to gain accreditation as a Safe Community and to help guide the development and implementation of community safety initiatives.

More information about the Royal Children's Hospital

 
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